Victorian (AUST) CRPS GUIDE BOOK

Its hard navigating your way through CRPS and scary as hell when your new and totally have no idea of what to do next. The lovely Danielle from RSD CRPS Victoria Australia has created a thorough Guide for sufferers of CRPS in the Aussie state of Victoria.

This insanely thorough guide can be downloaded from the page (link above) and Danielle is keen for the guide to become a guide for other states if someone is willing to take on the project. This is something I have been wanting to do for my state of South Australia.

Imagine if we could have one for each state in Australia, New Zealand, The US and The UK. Anywhere really. Imagine how you would have felt if way back when, you were able to access a guide that told you off all the appropriate resources available in your area. I know that this is something I have been wanting to provide along with other projects that will bring awareness to our cause.

One day we will be as normal and understood as people with other Neurological problems. I cant wait! xx

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RESEARCH PROJECT: Aussie CRPS Sufferers

This is something worth sharing for any Aussie sufferers out there. This came from the Australian Pain Management Association’s Facebook page. I’ve sent in for some more info. Lots of research happening in Australia at the moment.

Australian Pain Management Association 

RESEARCH PROJECT: CRPS. If you have Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), you are invited to take part in a project to examine the impact that CRPS has had on your life. The researchers will investigate what it’s like to live with CRPS in Australia, what the impact your condition has on your life and that of your family and health goals. The research will identify strengths and weaknesses in current practice in Australia and will identify areas for improvement and reform. If you’d like to receive more information about taking part, please email secretary@painmanagement.org.au

IN THE MEDIA: Chronic Pain, 7.30 South Australia

“It is a common condition, patients suffer from it, doctors treat it but Medicare doesn’t acknowledge it. It’s chronic pain. But what causes it and why do traditional drugs seem to have little effect?”

pain 730

This is the introduction to a news story that was shown on our state edition of the Current Affairs program 7.40. Its really exciting that this show has done a few stories on Chronic Pain already this year and although not exactly about CRPS, It still relates back to the treatments and the health system that I and many other Australians rely on.

I posted about the first story here. Australia’s Pain Epidemic

This story by Mike Sexton and shown on 7.30 South Australia, on Fri, 21 Feb, 2014.  Duration: 6min 13sec. It starts as stated above and then leads into some horrifying, yet unsurprising statistics that Medicare (Australia) has found that up to 5% of patients in Gp’s clinics are seeking relief from Chronic Pain. It again mentioned that most Australian’s suffering from Chronic Pain wait 2-3 years for a placement in a pain treatment facility. This leads to Gp’s prescribing more and more opioid pain Medications and leads to dependency. Clearly there is a cycle here that must be broken.  I’m hoping that the Website will post a manuscript to this story as it has done in the past so that I can post it.

One exciting thing bit of information that I learnt from the story is of a local research project happening right here in South Australia at the Bionomics Facilities in Hindmarsh, is a focus on Ion channels and their role in Chronic Pain. The story went on to report of an investment of 170 million dollars (Aust)  being made into this study by Merck & Co. That is pretty exciting really. I went onto the Bionomics Website and found the following:

“Bionomics has entered into a collaboration with Merck & Co. to develop a novel oral treatment for chronic pain. Chronic pain is a severely debilitating condition with a large unmet medical need. Current analgesic medications which include anti-epileptics, anti-arrhythmics, opioids, NSAID’s and anti-depressants, are either ineffective, associated with a range of dose limiting side effects or have the potential for abuse and addiction. Our novel treatment which is expected to deliver greater efficacy and safety than existing pain medications is directed towards an undisclosed target that has been strongly linked to chronic pain in humans.”

www.bionomics.com.au/research-development/pipeline/cns-central-nervous-system

Well Im off to investigate further and see what else I can learn about this trial and even if I can participate in any way. 🙂

 

When Creina, Jim and Jezebel came to stay!

As much as CRPS/RSD is simply a big load of BS, the thing that I am so grateful for I the friends that I have made all because I have this horrible nerve disease. It’s easy to get bogged down in the bad stuff, but there is no denying that because of Facebook, I have met some awesome people that have been so supportive. For me the day I joined my first FB group was the day it all got so much better.

One of those people is my good friend Creina, from Adelaide. She was one of the first people with CRPS that I met and we have become great friends. She is at the beginning of a huge trip around Eastern Australia with her very supportive husband Jim and sweet little westie terrier, Jezebel.

One their way through to Victoria, Creina, Jim and Jez stopped off at our place in the South East for a few days to enjoy the cooler weather, go to the beach and relax. Well that was the plan anyway! We managed a walk on the beach the afternoon they arrived and then it rained until they left. So much for summer! It was so cold that winter clothes came out and there was certainly no swimming. We were really looking forwards to soaking in the water and taking in all of the magnesium that we could. There is always next time.

What the weather did offer was the opportunity to have a look around the town and take it easy. A quick breakfast and then a look through the shops. This included shopping in the chemist for pain killers and other options. Lol, that’s something only a person with chronic pain can relate to.  We walked the two dogs around the town in between stops. Gemma and Jezebel became fast friends, it was so sad for them when it was time to say good bye.

The thing that I loved about having Creina here, other than having her here…  was that we were both in the same condition and were able to do things without trying to keep up. It was fantastic. We just plodded along at our own pace. I didn’t have to drag myself around in pain because she understood when I needed to stop. I have found that even though others make allowances, it still ends up as more of a compromise and I crash in no time. I am learning to say no though.

Sadly in no time, it was time for them to head off on their trip. They are traveling in a Winnebago and towing a beautiful yacht that they will sail whenever they can. It’s really inspiring to see someone with CRPS achieve their goals and overcome such debilitating hurdles.

Have fun guys. xxx

All photos by C Krause

1, Creina and I

2, Jezebel and Gemma at the beach

3, The Big Lobster (aka Larry), Kingston SE, SA

IN THE MEDIA: Australia’s Pain Epidemic.

r974807_10607495

The other day I was tagged into a Facebook post  of a news story called Australia faces silent epidemic of chronic pain that was shown on the current affairs show, 7.30, on the ABC (Aust). The story its self wasn’t exactly about CRPS but it may as well have been. It discussed the shortage of pain treatment in Australia and the long waiting list to access treatment. I once again was reminded of how lucky I was to get into treatment within three months. The story also went into the way we suffer and rely on addictive opioids to get by each day. I really related to this story and even felt a little emotional watching it. It was so good to see that we are getting some sort of coverage within the media for all sufferers of chronic pain.

Here is a link to the story:

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3548714.htm

And for those that cant watch it, here is the transcript of the story:

 

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Broadcast: 18/07/2012

Reporter: Sarah Dingle

One in five of us will feel it and it costs some $34 billion each year, but how well equipped are we to face and treat chronic pain?

Transcript

LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: Chronic pain is one of Australia’s most expensive health problems, costing our economy around $34 billion every year. Yet there’s only a handful of clinics that specialise in treating pain. It might surprise you to learn that these days, pain isn’t just considered a symptom, but a chronic disease in itself. Even so, most medical professionals still aren’t trained to deal with it. Today, the New South Wales Government committed $26 million towards developing new pain management services, but that will only meet a fraction of the need. Sarah Dingle reports.

SARAH DINGLE, REPORTER: It’s dinner time at the Quinzi house, but one member of the family hasn’t made it to the table.

ANTONELLA QUINZI, CHRONIC PAIN SUFFERER: When I get home, 6.30, quarter to 7, bath, I can’t even eat sometimes ’cause of the pain, and I wait for the medication to start working. Go to bed. I go to bed. That’s my solace.

SARAH DINGLE: It’s seven hours since Antonella Quinzi last took a heavy-duty painkiller and the strain is beginning to show.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Right now I can tell you 100 per cent, I’m trying to hold it together, I’m in front of the camera, I don’t want to look like, you know… but yeah, it’s hard.

SARAH DINGLE: What kind of sensations?

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Well, numbness. Throbbing pain. You feel like the whole body is on fire. It takes your breath away.

SARAH DINGLE: Seven years ago, with her family complete, Antonella Quinzi had a hysterectomy. It was meant to be a routine procedure, to put an end to persistent gynaecological problems. But it left her with severed pelvic nerves and a shattered life.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: It got so bad two years ago that I didn’t want to live any more. And I know I shouldn’t say that. Because God gives you a life to enjoy to the fullest. And… you know, but we all get weak. There’s weak moments.

MICHAEL COUSINS, ROYAL NORTH SHORE HOSPITAL: Chronic pain is the most prevalent, most costly and largest health problem that at the moment is largely undiscovered and terribly undertreated.

SARAH DINGLE: At Sydney’s Royal North Shore Hospital, Professor Michael Cousins runs one of the few multi-disciplinary pain clinics in the country.

Patient Philip Lewington has chronic pain. Pain that persists long after the initial injury that caused it has healed. The former machine operator had his thumb crushed six years ago in a workplace accident.

PHILIP LEWINGTON, CHRONIC PAIN SUFFERER: I have tried acupuncture, pain management, drugs galore. Physiotherapy. And none of it’s worked. I thought about chopping it off, but…

DOCTOR: You thought about chopping the thumb off?

PHILIP LEWINGTON: Yeah.

DOCTOR: What do you think that would do?

PHILIP LEWINGTON: I don’t know.

DOCTOR: Ha ha!

PHILIP LEWINGTON: Get rid of the pain I hope.

SARAH DINGLE: Here patients are treated by a team of specialists. Including clinical psychologists to ease the enormous mental burden of ongoing pain.

PHILIP LEWINGTON: My life, family life is nowhere near what it was. Um… sex life, basically non-existent, because of medication and what not. So not good at all.

SARAH DINGLE: It may not seem like it, but Philip Lewington is one of the lucky ones. Many wait for years for this kind of treatment.

Victorian pain specialist Dr Michael Vagg is says it’s a national embarrassment that that Australia pays almost no attention to its epidemic of chronic pain.

MICHAEL VAGG, PAIN MANAGEMENT UNIT, GEELONG HOSPITAL: One in five Australians will develop chronic pain at some point in their life, and only one in 20 of those people will have it adequately addressed.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: You live your life around the tablet.

SARAH DINGLE: Like many sufferers of chronic pain, Antonella Quinzi went to her family GP, who prescribed the opioid painkiller oxycontin. Now she’s an addict.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: The first year of taking the oxycontin I went from five milligrams to 10, 15 and 20, then I went up to 30.

SARAH DINGLE: Without the medication, the pain is overwhelming. She gets rashes and starts to shake.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: And that’s the reason why I’ve had to do little sneakies and take extra oxycontin at work. When you’re desperate, you will do anything to get rid of that anguish and pain.

MICHAEL VAGG: Many GPs feel compelled to provide strong painkillers, even though the best evidence would suggest in many cases they’re not improving people’s quality of life in the long term.

SARAH DINGLE: Pain specialists say chronic pain is caused by damaged nerves, sending electronic signals to the brain, and it could be that drugs are not the answer. Instead, surgeons are working with technology, inserting electronic stimulators next to the spine to block the pain signals. Now Australian researchers are about to take this much further, in a world-first.

MICHAEL COUSINS: There’s the tip of the needle. So that’s still going in the mid-line. That’s really good.

SARAH DINGLE: Professor Cousins carefully inches the electronic stimulator close to the spine.

MICHAEL COUSINS: Still wants to go a bit to the left. It’s OK to go a little to the left but not too much. All right, we’re ready to do a trial stim now.

SARAH DINGLE: For the first time, the surgeon can see live nerve responses recorded as he operates. And move the stimulator so it best blocks the pain signal.

MICHAEL COUSINS: The electrode is just to the left side of the midline. And half a millimetre of difference in position will produce a different area of stimulation. So we’re waiting now to see what the patient actually feels.

NURSE: Is that tingling?

PATIENT: Yes.

NURSE: And is that in your left side?

PATIENT: Yes.

NURSE: Is it in your left back?

PATIENT: No.

NURSE: Buttock?

PATIENT: Um… no. It’s, like, down the whole leg.

MICHAEL COUSINS: We might bring that down just a touch then.

NURSE: Yep. Electrons 2, 3, four when you’ve got ankle, all of them there, just to the middle of the buttock.

MICHAEL COUSINS: We managed to get electrodes placed in just the right spot. She started to feel some pain relief. It will take a couple of days to get that fully operational.

SARAH DINGLE: For now, Antonella Quinzi’s only source of pain relief is medication. But she clings to that same hope for a cure.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Pray for healing. I pray for healing. I pray that I will wake up one morning and… not have this. 

Kankles and pain after a big day!

Today, having my friend stay with me has taken its toll on my poor body. Im 3 days in and in pain. Its hard to explain to people how Im feeling so I hit the tramadol and hope for the best. I had a few vodkas last night and that has stirred things up and as you can see in the picture below i’m very swollen this evening.

Today my town held its annual show and we went along for a look. We are both into horse riding so we watched the show jumping and hacking. Tomorrow is the dressage so I’m keen for that. I’m hoping for some inspiration to enthuse me to get into a position where I could stay in the saddle for more than ten minutes without being in pain. I would love to compete again but for now its purely for Physio therapy and to keep me active.

We also went along and watched the speed shears in the pavilion. I have to say I enjoyed it even if I hate being in a shearing shed. Really I was just glad there was seating and I could get off of my feet.

Another exciting thing that happened was that I got to pat a large python. I could just fit my hands around its body and it was probably 2 metres long. I’ve held small snakes before but this was so much different. The snake was so much softer than I expected. Stunning creature really. The animal exhibition also had a Tawny Frogmouth that I had a pat of. I love these birds so much. It was great to see people being educated about wildlife conservation in our region.

So after all of this action I am ready to drop. I have another day and a half before my friend leaves and I’m going to be sad to see her go. I wish I could say that i get to rest after but Tuesday afternoon I get to see my current, and I mean current GP and then Wednesday i]I’m off to Adelaide for 2 days. I’m having my MRI on Thursday at the Royal Adelaide and I’m also hoping to catch up with some of the South Aussie  CRPS  crew. We are up to 6 people now and we have a new person who will hopefully make the meeting.

 Ok off to  try to sleep and typing is hurting my arms too much. Hope your all well. xx