FULL MOONS and PAIN

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Something that I noticed early on in my life with CRPS and Chronic pain was that my pain and other sufferer’s pain would always rise during a full moon. I’ve always found that a Full Moon effected my moods and sleep so why not pain? After all how do you also explain our pain being greater at night than during the day? Isn’t it equally plausible that the moon cycle could effect us in a similar way?  I did a little research and found that I might have been on to something.  I read how people with arthritis often experienced more pain around a full moon and that epileptic’s had more seizures.

I am in an Aussie and Kiwi Facebook group that chats on a daily basis and it was due to us all being sick with pain flares and my noticing it was always a Full Moon that all of us were online complaining of a shocking flare. So for the next few months I didn’t allow myself to know when the next full moon was unless we were all syncing our flares again. After all its only natural for women to sync up. Lol. Sure enough there was a pattern and over time even the non-believers in the group now whinge about Full moons. Especially one person in particular, who bullied me for my theory and is now the first to announce the arrival of a full moon as if it was him all along who brought it to the group. Oh well!

TODAY 14th MAY 2014 IS A FULL MOON HERE IN AUSTRALIA

Basically it’s all to do with Ions in the air that are either positively or negatively charged. During a Full Moon the air is positively charged and this causes a hormonal reaction in our bodies.

“Ions are floating in the air around us all of the time and have either negative or positive charges. Changes in their concentrations or in the ratio of positively to negatively charged molecules can have remarkable effects on plants and animals. It is known in science that ion depletion is the source of a wide range of human health problems, both mental and physical.

These air ions are important to you because if they have a high proportion of negative ions in the clusters you will feel lively, uplifted and enthusiastic. Too many positive ions in the clusters will have you feeling depressed, lethargic and full of aches, pains and complaints.”

Read the full article at www.quantumenergywerks.com

So what do you think?

I hope the Full Moon is kind to you. xx

TWO OUTTA THREE AIN’T BAD! Three pain conditions suck worse than yours!

“Got pain? These three pain conditions suck worse than yours.” paindatabase.com

Ha! Dont you love it when these lists pop up. Designed to make the average person feel better about them self. Sure if you have aches and pains, migraines or any other type of pain reading about these horrific conditions would make you feel better. Unless you suffer from two out of three of the condition in the list your reading, as I do! While I am used to seeing the standard lists with CRPS, my other condition rarely rates a mention, but here it is. and when you cover most of a list like this one, where do you go from there to make yourself feel better? Most of the time I think “at least it wont kill me!”

Here is how the article started but you can also read it in full here

Oh humans. We vile creatures, who feel better when others are doing comparatively worse. Rest assured, reading about these three painful conditions will not make you feel permanently better. But it might give you a bit of temporary perspective. 

no 1, Cluster Headaches: Check! yep I have these mean and nasty things that make me want to cut my face off. They come around every 6 months and make my life hell for anywhere from a day to a week. They are mean and I should probably do some posts about them on here. I have just had a bout in the last few days which is why I had been looking on line for info and came across this article. I woke up three days ago thinking that I had a tooth ache and then realised it was on all of my teeth on the right side. In no time at all it had spread into my ear, my eye, down my check and into my throat, all on the right side and all beyond intense. Lucky i also had a Doctors appointment on the first day so I could finally have it looked at. Yet the past three days have been a walk in the park compared to some of the attacks I have had. Lucky me!

No 2, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, I dont really need to introduce this one. Most of us know it all too well. I did learn one thing though, That TV show House, The lead character had CRPS apparently. The article said to watch seasons 1-4. Ill pass on that. Perhaps that could go on my new “it could be worse” list. lol, Not my cup of tea really.

“CRPS is a strange condition because it can range from fairly mild to absolutely debilitating. I learned about it after watching House MD, in an episode where Dr. House got shot and forced himself into a coma using a hallucinogenic drug called ketamine. He miraculously wakes up pain-free for the first time in years. “

I will admit though that while “normal” people would look at this list and feel so much better about their own pain, I look at it and feel justified for getting annoyed at those annoying people who post on Facebook how hard they have it when they have it so much easier yet dont realise how much they have. Their health, freedom, ability to work, socialise, meet men, etc.  I guess ignorance is bliss and I may have also been that person once.  Thinking about it, if I could push a button and make all of this go away, Im not sure I would. My pain has changed me for the better as well as the bad and I’m clearly going through this to get to where I need to be. Really though, How tough am I??? 🙂

And I just gotta do it, ever since I wrote the tittle this has been in my head. 🙂 Enjoy!

PAIN SCALE: Here is a good one.

I found this fantastic Pain Scale the other day and thought that I would share it with you all. I do not know where it originates from but it is too good not to share. I have in the past found it hard to find a good definition of each level of pain. For my own pain diaries that I have been asked to keep by my Doctors, I have merged many together and made do with what I had. I like that this one justifies what is minor, moderate and severe pain.

PainScale

If anyone knows where this chart originates than please let me know. I like to give credit where credit is due. 🙂

MEOW: My cat is the best medicine

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Ok, sure her purring and weight isn’t ideal on a bad day where even my clothing can hurt my poor body, But I love my little girl and the comfort that she gives me is worth that extra bit of discomfort. I’m in pain anyway!  On a not so bad day, I feel blessed that I am “worthy” of her cuddles. Yeah, any one with a cat knows what I mean by that! On nights when I’m flaring Molly will come to bed with me or climb my window screen until I hobble out of bed to let her in. She has taken to sleeping next to me rather than on me since I’ve developed CRPS. On a bad day she sticks by me and has taken to leading me to the couch and waiting for me to sit before lightly climbing on. She seems to know before I do that I need to rest. Although, I do think she loves having me there to nurse her all night long.

IN THE MEDIA: Chronic Pain, 7.30 South Australia

“It is a common condition, patients suffer from it, doctors treat it but Medicare doesn’t acknowledge it. It’s chronic pain. But what causes it and why do traditional drugs seem to have little effect?”

pain 730

This is the introduction to a news story that was shown on our state edition of the Current Affairs program 7.40. Its really exciting that this show has done a few stories on Chronic Pain already this year and although not exactly about CRPS, It still relates back to the treatments and the health system that I and many other Australians rely on.

I posted about the first story here. Australia’s Pain Epidemic

This story by Mike Sexton and shown on 7.30 South Australia, on Fri, 21 Feb, 2014.  Duration: 6min 13sec. It starts as stated above and then leads into some horrifying, yet unsurprising statistics that Medicare (Australia) has found that up to 5% of patients in Gp’s clinics are seeking relief from Chronic Pain. It again mentioned that most Australian’s suffering from Chronic Pain wait 2-3 years for a placement in a pain treatment facility. This leads to Gp’s prescribing more and more opioid pain Medications and leads to dependency. Clearly there is a cycle here that must be broken.  I’m hoping that the Website will post a manuscript to this story as it has done in the past so that I can post it.

One exciting thing bit of information that I learnt from the story is of a local research project happening right here in South Australia at the Bionomics Facilities in Hindmarsh, is a focus on Ion channels and their role in Chronic Pain. The story went on to report of an investment of 170 million dollars (Aust)  being made into this study by Merck & Co. That is pretty exciting really. I went onto the Bionomics Website and found the following:

“Bionomics has entered into a collaboration with Merck & Co. to develop a novel oral treatment for chronic pain. Chronic pain is a severely debilitating condition with a large unmet medical need. Current analgesic medications which include anti-epileptics, anti-arrhythmics, opioids, NSAID’s and anti-depressants, are either ineffective, associated with a range of dose limiting side effects or have the potential for abuse and addiction. Our novel treatment which is expected to deliver greater efficacy and safety than existing pain medications is directed towards an undisclosed target that has been strongly linked to chronic pain in humans.”

www.bionomics.com.au/research-development/pipeline/cns-central-nervous-system

Well Im off to investigate further and see what else I can learn about this trial and even if I can participate in any way. 🙂

 

When Creina, Jim and Jezebel came to stay!

As much as CRPS/RSD is simply a big load of BS, the thing that I am so grateful for I the friends that I have made all because I have this horrible nerve disease. It’s easy to get bogged down in the bad stuff, but there is no denying that because of Facebook, I have met some awesome people that have been so supportive. For me the day I joined my first FB group was the day it all got so much better.

One of those people is my good friend Creina, from Adelaide. She was one of the first people with CRPS that I met and we have become great friends. She is at the beginning of a huge trip around Eastern Australia with her very supportive husband Jim and sweet little westie terrier, Jezebel.

One their way through to Victoria, Creina, Jim and Jez stopped off at our place in the South East for a few days to enjoy the cooler weather, go to the beach and relax. Well that was the plan anyway! We managed a walk on the beach the afternoon they arrived and then it rained until they left. So much for summer! It was so cold that winter clothes came out and there was certainly no swimming. We were really looking forwards to soaking in the water and taking in all of the magnesium that we could. There is always next time.

What the weather did offer was the opportunity to have a look around the town and take it easy. A quick breakfast and then a look through the shops. This included shopping in the chemist for pain killers and other options. Lol, that’s something only a person with chronic pain can relate to.  We walked the two dogs around the town in between stops. Gemma and Jezebel became fast friends, it was so sad for them when it was time to say good bye.

The thing that I loved about having Creina here, other than having her here…  was that we were both in the same condition and were able to do things without trying to keep up. It was fantastic. We just plodded along at our own pace. I didn’t have to drag myself around in pain because she understood when I needed to stop. I have found that even though others make allowances, it still ends up as more of a compromise and I crash in no time. I am learning to say no though.

Sadly in no time, it was time for them to head off on their trip. They are traveling in a Winnebago and towing a beautiful yacht that they will sail whenever they can. It’s really inspiring to see someone with CRPS achieve their goals and overcome such debilitating hurdles.

Have fun guys. xxx

All photos by C Krause

1, Creina and I

2, Jezebel and Gemma at the beach

3, The Big Lobster (aka Larry), Kingston SE, SA

IN THE MEDIA: Australia’s Pain Epidemic.

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The other day I was tagged into a Facebook post  of a news story called Australia faces silent epidemic of chronic pain that was shown on the current affairs show, 7.30, on the ABC (Aust). The story its self wasn’t exactly about CRPS but it may as well have been. It discussed the shortage of pain treatment in Australia and the long waiting list to access treatment. I once again was reminded of how lucky I was to get into treatment within three months. The story also went into the way we suffer and rely on addictive opioids to get by each day. I really related to this story and even felt a little emotional watching it. It was so good to see that we are getting some sort of coverage within the media for all sufferers of chronic pain.

Here is a link to the story:

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2012/s3548714.htm

And for those that cant watch it, here is the transcript of the story:

 

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Broadcast: 18/07/2012

Reporter: Sarah Dingle

One in five of us will feel it and it costs some $34 billion each year, but how well equipped are we to face and treat chronic pain?

Transcript

LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: Chronic pain is one of Australia’s most expensive health problems, costing our economy around $34 billion every year. Yet there’s only a handful of clinics that specialise in treating pain. It might surprise you to learn that these days, pain isn’t just considered a symptom, but a chronic disease in itself. Even so, most medical professionals still aren’t trained to deal with it. Today, the New South Wales Government committed $26 million towards developing new pain management services, but that will only meet a fraction of the need. Sarah Dingle reports.

SARAH DINGLE, REPORTER: It’s dinner time at the Quinzi house, but one member of the family hasn’t made it to the table.

ANTONELLA QUINZI, CHRONIC PAIN SUFFERER: When I get home, 6.30, quarter to 7, bath, I can’t even eat sometimes ’cause of the pain, and I wait for the medication to start working. Go to bed. I go to bed. That’s my solace.

SARAH DINGLE: It’s seven hours since Antonella Quinzi last took a heavy-duty painkiller and the strain is beginning to show.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Right now I can tell you 100 per cent, I’m trying to hold it together, I’m in front of the camera, I don’t want to look like, you know… but yeah, it’s hard.

SARAH DINGLE: What kind of sensations?

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Well, numbness. Throbbing pain. You feel like the whole body is on fire. It takes your breath away.

SARAH DINGLE: Seven years ago, with her family complete, Antonella Quinzi had a hysterectomy. It was meant to be a routine procedure, to put an end to persistent gynaecological problems. But it left her with severed pelvic nerves and a shattered life.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: It got so bad two years ago that I didn’t want to live any more. And I know I shouldn’t say that. Because God gives you a life to enjoy to the fullest. And… you know, but we all get weak. There’s weak moments.

MICHAEL COUSINS, ROYAL NORTH SHORE HOSPITAL: Chronic pain is the most prevalent, most costly and largest health problem that at the moment is largely undiscovered and terribly undertreated.

SARAH DINGLE: At Sydney’s Royal North Shore Hospital, Professor Michael Cousins runs one of the few multi-disciplinary pain clinics in the country.

Patient Philip Lewington has chronic pain. Pain that persists long after the initial injury that caused it has healed. The former machine operator had his thumb crushed six years ago in a workplace accident.

PHILIP LEWINGTON, CHRONIC PAIN SUFFERER: I have tried acupuncture, pain management, drugs galore. Physiotherapy. And none of it’s worked. I thought about chopping it off, but…

DOCTOR: You thought about chopping the thumb off?

PHILIP LEWINGTON: Yeah.

DOCTOR: What do you think that would do?

PHILIP LEWINGTON: I don’t know.

DOCTOR: Ha ha!

PHILIP LEWINGTON: Get rid of the pain I hope.

SARAH DINGLE: Here patients are treated by a team of specialists. Including clinical psychologists to ease the enormous mental burden of ongoing pain.

PHILIP LEWINGTON: My life, family life is nowhere near what it was. Um… sex life, basically non-existent, because of medication and what not. So not good at all.

SARAH DINGLE: It may not seem like it, but Philip Lewington is one of the lucky ones. Many wait for years for this kind of treatment.

Victorian pain specialist Dr Michael Vagg is says it’s a national embarrassment that that Australia pays almost no attention to its epidemic of chronic pain.

MICHAEL VAGG, PAIN MANAGEMENT UNIT, GEELONG HOSPITAL: One in five Australians will develop chronic pain at some point in their life, and only one in 20 of those people will have it adequately addressed.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: You live your life around the tablet.

SARAH DINGLE: Like many sufferers of chronic pain, Antonella Quinzi went to her family GP, who prescribed the opioid painkiller oxycontin. Now she’s an addict.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: The first year of taking the oxycontin I went from five milligrams to 10, 15 and 20, then I went up to 30.

SARAH DINGLE: Without the medication, the pain is overwhelming. She gets rashes and starts to shake.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: And that’s the reason why I’ve had to do little sneakies and take extra oxycontin at work. When you’re desperate, you will do anything to get rid of that anguish and pain.

MICHAEL VAGG: Many GPs feel compelled to provide strong painkillers, even though the best evidence would suggest in many cases they’re not improving people’s quality of life in the long term.

SARAH DINGLE: Pain specialists say chronic pain is caused by damaged nerves, sending electronic signals to the brain, and it could be that drugs are not the answer. Instead, surgeons are working with technology, inserting electronic stimulators next to the spine to block the pain signals. Now Australian researchers are about to take this much further, in a world-first.

MICHAEL COUSINS: There’s the tip of the needle. So that’s still going in the mid-line. That’s really good.

SARAH DINGLE: Professor Cousins carefully inches the electronic stimulator close to the spine.

MICHAEL COUSINS: Still wants to go a bit to the left. It’s OK to go a little to the left but not too much. All right, we’re ready to do a trial stim now.

SARAH DINGLE: For the first time, the surgeon can see live nerve responses recorded as he operates. And move the stimulator so it best blocks the pain signal.

MICHAEL COUSINS: The electrode is just to the left side of the midline. And half a millimetre of difference in position will produce a different area of stimulation. So we’re waiting now to see what the patient actually feels.

NURSE: Is that tingling?

PATIENT: Yes.

NURSE: And is that in your left side?

PATIENT: Yes.

NURSE: Is it in your left back?

PATIENT: No.

NURSE: Buttock?

PATIENT: Um… no. It’s, like, down the whole leg.

MICHAEL COUSINS: We might bring that down just a touch then.

NURSE: Yep. Electrons 2, 3, four when you’ve got ankle, all of them there, just to the middle of the buttock.

MICHAEL COUSINS: We managed to get electrodes placed in just the right spot. She started to feel some pain relief. It will take a couple of days to get that fully operational.

SARAH DINGLE: For now, Antonella Quinzi’s only source of pain relief is medication. But she clings to that same hope for a cure.

ANTONELLA QUINZI: Pray for healing. I pray for healing. I pray that I will wake up one morning and… not have this.